Things I’m learning

DSC_0162

This week, I’m (starting) to work on learning my conversions.  Because I should have some idea what people are talking about when they speak of meters or liters, centimeters and grams.

I am also working on learning that just because it looks chilly or windy outside doesn’t mean I shouldn’t go outside.  We’ve had some truly lovely weather since we got to Scotland, but Fall is starting to peek out around the corners.  Here and there you can see the leaves starting to go yellow, and the wind is starting to pick up.  We’ve been told that the winters here are windy and damp, not generally bitterly cold or overly snowy.  But I’ve been spoiled by California and feel a deep reluctance to leave the house if it is anything less than glorious outside.  So this week I am working on breaking that bad habit.  Because it is still lovely in the evenings when the sun finally breaks free from the clouds and lights up the sea, even if I do have to wear a jacket.

In part because of the cooler weather, I finally got around to making a recipe that my friend had sent to me a few years ago.  It’s a kind of fry bread called Bannock that her family makes in Canada.  I never got around to making it in California, but it seems like a pretty perfect Scottish recipe.  It’s super simple, and very adaptable.  Great if you need something warm and comforting on the fly since the ingredients are very run of the mill.  I cut the recipe below in half and had plenty for two people.

Bannock

3 cups flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 tsp salt
1 1/2 cups milk (or water)
Heat 1/4 cup of oil in a large skillet on medium.  Form the dough into small pancake shapes.  My dough was very sticky, so I sprinkled a little more flour on top before shaping.  Fry in the hot oil for about 1 minute per side, or until the bread is a nice golden brown.
DSC_0163
 DSC_0164
DSC_0165
For a savory bread you could add a clove of garlic, some small pieces of softened onion, or cheese.  For a sweet treat I like to sprinkle the hot bannock with cinnamon sugar.
DSC_0166